“A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Reptile Room” by Lemony Snicket

The_Reptile_Room_USA.pngI finished this book a couple days ago (while I was enjoying the pool at my apartment complex). It’s a short book, so it’s one of those that you could probably finish in one sitting if you had a couple hours to spare.

In this second installation of the Baudelaires’ tale, the three orphans have convinced everyone that Count Olaf is insane and they have now been passed on to their Uncle Monty, whom they have never met before. His name is actually Dr. Montgomery Montgomery (no lie) but “Dr. Monty” just flows so much better.

You know from the beginning that something is going to happen because the author actually writes that this story will not have a happy ending and *character* will face *certain demise.* It’s actually pretty dark for a children’s series.

But anyway, Count Olaf is still evil and Mr. Poe (the banker who manages the children’s fortune) is still oblivious so more crazy antics that the Baudelaire orphans have to put up with.

I haven’t started reading the third book yet, “The Wide Window,” but I am reading “I’ll Give You the Sun” by Jandy Nelson. Plus I’m still working on “Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded” by Hannah Hart. They’re both really good books so far, I just haven’t made time to sit down and read them like I should.

To be honest, my to-be-read list keeps growing and growing and I feel like I’m barely making a dent. It’s a struggle. But I will conquer.

Later,
Maegan

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“Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir” by Jenny Lawson

letpretendthisneverhappened11At least it didn’t take me THAT long to finish this book after I finished “Furiously Happy.”

There have been plenty of moments where things were mentioned in one or both of the books and I couldn’t remember where it first came up. And there was a trippy moment at the end of this book where Jenny Lawson wrote, “That’ll be in book two!” and I had to stop and think about whether that actually was in book two. I kinda don’t think it was.

But anyway, this book is the memoir of Jenny Lawson, the Bloggess. I’ve heard of her before and I’ve seen these books in the stores, but I had never picked them up. I got this one as a Christmas present this past December, and it’s got a cool inscription from the author. I really have a thing about signed books.

There’s plenty of stuff going on in this book that you just think can’t be real life, but it’s a memoir so it’s definitely real life. There’s also a lot of taxidermy going on, but that’s explained in the book.

It’s interesting to see how someone else describes their life and to imagine that this is what the life of someone else is like. It’s impressive to me when someone has the guts to share their own story to begin with. And there were plenty of opportunities for a laugh in this book.

Next up, I’ve already got three more books in the works. I’m reading “Buffering” by Hannah Hart, “Everything, Everything” by Nicola Yoon, and “Two by Two” by Nicholas Sparks.

Bye for now,
Maegan

“Furiously Happy” by Jenny Lawson

81bAquOCgWLI promise, I tried really hard not to finish this book before finishing Jenny Lawson’s first book, “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir,” but it was just really difficult and I failed.

I blame audiobook library lending limits. I think I only have five more days left, which is arguably long enough to finish the 60 or so pages of “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened” and then finish this book, but listening to audiobooks is so much easier than sitting down to read the physical book. Darn you, technology.

Anyway, I started reading this book because I was halfway through her first book and I liked it pretty well and “Furiously Happy” was available at the time in both audiobook and e-book. So I mostly listened to it on audiobook and then occasionally flipped through the e-book to see the pictures. There were a couple parts where something completely off the wall was mentioned, followed by “I wrote all about that in my first book” and it was just another reminder of how I failed to read two unrelated books by the same author in the correct order.

The book starts with a blog post that Lawson wrote when she was going through a bad phase of depression where she decided that instead of being hidden away from the world, she just decided that she was going to be furiously happy instead. There are plenty of stories where Lawson writes about conversations she has with her therapist and crazy arguments she has with her husband (they’re the cutest) and how bad she is at dinner parties and it’s just great because it’s so real. She writes a lot about struggling with mental illness and I think it was good to see it from a different perspective. I have never really been able to understand what people who have mental illness are going through and she explained it in a really well done way.

She’s also incredibly hilarious. She curses plenty in the book, but she has some pretty funny stories to tell. I’m sure she would be a really good friend in real life.

Until next time,
Maegan

“Tuesdays with Morrie” by Mitch Albom

ImageI am on a mission to read every book I own. My bookshelf is pretty much organized by author’s last name, with a few newer additions just thrown in where there’s space.

Last time I checked I own around 185 books so this could take me years with the amount of times I get distracted by new library books.

Anywho, the only reason I own this book is because my stepsister once had to read it as a summer reading assignment in high school. She’s not one to read leisurely, so eventually the book came into my possession. I’ve read it once before but it’s been a few years.

This one is less than 200 pages, and I finished it in two days. But that’s pretty easy because I’m on vacation, and the job that I finally locked down hasn’t begun yet.

The book is based on a true story, and is basically just a true book. I guess that’s the definition of non-fiction, which is usually not my type. This is one good one though.

It just basically tells about the author’s weekly meetings with his old college professor, who has contracted Lou Gehrig’s disease. He is slowly fading away but he refuses to let it get to him. Instead, he detaches himself from it and instead uses what’s left of his existence to spend time with family and friends and just appreciate life. 

There’re lots of little meaningful things that Morrie says that it seems like the whole world should hear. It seems interesting to me that this one man can see and understand what makes the world bad and he can share how to fix it, but the majority of the population cannot see the same things. If one man is able to realize all of this, why can’t everyone else?

I’m going to go ponder the meaning of life now,
Maegan