“A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Wide Window” by Lemony Snicket

The_Wide_WindowI’ve finished another. Progress.

This is the third installment of “A Series of Unfortunate Events,” which detail the lives of poor Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire, who lost their parents and their massive house and all their belongings in a fire.

At this point, they’ve already been forced into Count Olaf’s house, then Uncle Monty, and now Aunt Josephine. Funny thing about Aunt Josephine: She lives in a house that is basically hanging out from a cliff over the top of a lake, but she’s terrified of everything, included, but not limited to, stoves, telephones, doorknobs, and welcome mats. Aunt Josephine means well but she is really not a very good guardian for the three orphans. And she is super annoyingly into grammar. I mean, I appreciate the nuances of the English language, but she corrects every grammar mistake made in her presence, to an unreasonable degree.

Of course, Count Olaf shows up, no one believes the orphans, Count Olaf is evil, and the Baudelaires are still miserable. At this point, they don’t have any more relatives to go to, so who knows what will happen to them next. Well I know because I’ve read the series before and watched the first season of the Netflix series. Nevertheless, more despair to come.

I’ll probably wait to start the fourth book, “The Miserable Mill,” until I’ve finished a book or two because I’m literally reading three other books right now too, which is pretty bad of me. But there’s just so much I want to experience that I can’t help myself. Fingers crossed that I can wrap up “I’ll Give You the Sun” by Jandy Nelson before it’s due back at the library.

I love libraries,
Maegan

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“The 5th Wave” by Rick Yancey

512And8xM0LThis book is pretty decent as far as young adult dystopian novels go. I first read it a couple years ago before the movie version was released and I remember being in shock and awe over all the twists and turns in the plot. It definitely keeps you guessing right up until the end. Then it leaves you hanging. So clearly I have already started reading the second novel in the series, “The Infinite Sea,” which I have also read before. I’m really excited about getting to the third book, “The Last Star,” because that one had not been released when I was reading this series the first time, so it’s all new territory.

I actually think I did a library foul because I borrowed all three books at once in e-book and audiobook format. But you can’t blame me too much because I’m getting through them pretty quickly. Plus I couldn’t chance it if someone checked out the next book after the one I was currently reading, because then I would just have to sit and wait until they were done and that is no bueno.

I like the writing in this book a lot because it is in human speak and the dialogue actually sounds like kids speaking, instead of what some adult thinks kids would sound like if they had gone to a secret etiquette-based boarding school in their formative years. And there’s just enough annoying teen drama to make it realistic but not so much that you sigh and consider chucking the book out your bedroom window.

So basically the plot is this: Everything is fine and dandy in Ohio/the world until *dun dun duhhh* the Arrival. The Mothership shows up in the sky and then the “Others” start making insanely terribly things happen to eradicate all human life. These things come in waves, i.e. “The 5th Wave” is eminent at the start of this book. Not surprisingly at all, a bunch of teenagers/kids figure out what is going on and try to handle that mess. But of course, the book ends pretty much immediately after some big action so you really don’t have much information about the impact of their actions.

One thing that gets me in this book: There’s this analogy that keeps popping up about humans being the cockroaches of the world compared to the Others, which is fine. Cockroaches are gross, but still. But there’s this other analogy that keeps coming up where the main character is referred to as a mayfly by her male companion. Like ew. If you’re trying to be sweet or romantic, how about a butterfly or something less ew? Really, you’re comparing this girl to a gross bug that hovers around water or something. Way to get some brownie points. But for some reason that is completely mysterious to me, this chick completely digs it and is all about being referred to as a gross bug. Her prerogative, I guess.

Anywho, now I’m on to “The Infinite Sea” while also simultaneously reading Jenny Lawson’s first two books, “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir” and “Furiously Happy.”

Just call me a book reading fiend,
Maegan

“Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” by J.K. Rowling

91igIGBj0vL.jpgWe all knew this one was coming. Being the Harry Potter nerd that I am, I saw this movie within a few days after it came out and I went on the waiting list to check out the screenplay in ebook format as soon as I could at my public library.

I finally got the ebook, but it took a few tries to get it fully read because I was reading a few other things too. So I’ve been working on this one for a few weeks and I finally finished it this morning.

Clearly J.K. Rowling is the queen of the wizarding world and she continues to reign forever and ever. It’s amazing all of the things she has created and shared with us over the years. I particularly like reading her screenplays because there are little details that you might miss in the movie but are pointed out in writing and it adds to the story. What’s even better is this movie is independent of any other books, so I didn’t torture myself by comparing what should or should not be happening during the movie. It was a great movie. I already have the movie poster hanging on my living room wall.

But anywho, I highly recommend the movie and the screenplay for all Potterheads, and I’m sure I will end up reading it again one day.

I’m only a few chapters shy of finishing “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” and I’m also reading “The One” now, which is part of the Selection series.

More on that later,
Maegan

“Catching Fire” by Suzanne Collins

catching_fireNaturally, since I read “The Hunger Games” I would be following up with “Catching Fire.” Of course I’ve read the whole series before, but it’s been a while so there were some details that I had forgotten about, but for the most part the story is pretty parallel in the book and the movie.

I don’t actually think I would have been able to finish this book without listening to the audiobook while I colored in my adult coloring book with my brand new Christmas present, aka fine tip markers. But I did it, yay! A few weeks ago… Yep, I forgot to post about the book after I finished the book, so I am about to double post here.

Anyway, I have to check with my public library to see if the audiobook for “Mockingjay” is available, then I can start on that one. I’m also working on “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” and I’m trying to decide whether I want to finish “This is Where it Ends.” I also just finished another book, but you’ll have to see the next post to find out about that one.

Until next time, aka a few minutes,
Maegan

Been here a year!

Happy anniversary to me and my blog!

When I look back, I never thought we would make it this far, but here we are. Look how far we’ve come! I’d like to thank my loyal followers, my parents, my local library, and my cat.

But seriously, I really didn’t think I would be able to keep this thing going. I’ve tried blogging before but I just never felt the need to share my thoughts with the world for extended periods of time. Until I realized that I could write about books, which is something I love an awful lot.

Unfortunately, in my post on my blog about books I have no news about books to share because i haven’t even started another book since I finished “Paper Towns” the other day. But I read probably 8 BuzzFeed articles about Harry Potter today so that is definitely forthcoming eventually.

Anyway, I am all kinds of tired so we are keeping this short.

Here’s to many more,
Maegan