“Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir” by Jenny Lawson

letpretendthisneverhappened11At least it didn’t take me THAT long to finish this book after I finished “Furiously Happy.”

There have been plenty of moments where things were mentioned in one or both of the books and I couldn’t remember where it first came up. And there was a trippy moment at the end of this book where Jenny Lawson wrote, “That’ll be in book two!” and I had to stop and think about whether that actually was in book two. I kinda don’t think it was.

But anyway, this book is the memoir of Jenny Lawson, the Bloggess. I’ve heard of her before and I’ve seen these books in the stores, but I had never picked them up. I got this one as a Christmas present this past December, and it’s got a cool inscription from the author. I really have a thing about signed books.

There’s plenty of stuff going on in this book that you just think can’t be real life, but it’s a memoir so it’s definitely real life. There’s also a lot of taxidermy going on, but that’s explained in the book.

It’s interesting to see how someone else describes their life and to imagine that this is what the life of someone else is like. It’s impressive to me when someone has the guts to share their own story to begin with. And there were plenty of opportunities for a laugh in this book.

Next up, I’ve already got three more books in the works. I’m reading “Buffering” by Hannah Hart, “Everything, Everything” by Nicola Yoon, and “Two by Two” by Nicholas Sparks.

Bye for now,
Maegan

“Furiously Happy” by Jenny Lawson

81bAquOCgWLI promise, I tried really hard not to finish this book before finishing Jenny Lawson’s first book, “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir,” but it was just really difficult and I failed.

I blame audiobook library lending limits. I think I only have five more days left, which is arguably long enough to finish the 60 or so pages of “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened” and then finish this book, but listening to audiobooks is so much easier than sitting down to read the physical book. Darn you, technology.

Anyway, I started reading this book because I was halfway through her first book and I liked it pretty well and “Furiously Happy” was available at the time in both audiobook and e-book. So I mostly listened to it on audiobook and then occasionally flipped through the e-book to see the pictures. There were a couple parts where something completely off the wall was mentioned, followed by “I wrote all about that in my first book” and it was just another reminder of how I failed to read two unrelated books by the same author in the correct order.

The book starts with a blog post that Lawson wrote when she was going through a bad phase of depression where she decided that instead of being hidden away from the world, she just decided that she was going to be furiously happy instead. There are plenty of stories where Lawson writes about conversations she has with her therapist and crazy arguments she has with her husband (they’re the cutest) and how bad she is at dinner parties and it’s just great because it’s so real. She writes a lot about struggling with mental illness and I think it was good to see it from a different perspective. I have never really been able to understand what people who have mental illness are going through and she explained it in a really well done way.

She’s also incredibly hilarious. She curses plenty in the book, but she has some pretty funny stories to tell. I’m sure she would be a really good friend in real life.

Until next time,
Maegan

“The Last Star” by Rick Yancey

51CC+o3cfQL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_This book was not nearly as intense as the first one in the series, “The 5th Wave.” I think what I liked about that book was that it kept surprising you over and over again and by now there’s really not much else that you don’t already know. Even the things that seem like they’re supposed to be surprises are just kind of confusing because Character A says this new thing, but Character B still thinks this thing like it originally was, but Character C says the same thing as Character A and you’re just like, “Who is the crazy one here, because someone is wrong.”

It was still pretty good though. Lots of loose ends were wrapped up, but not all of them. That character that kept defying death defied death again and this time he/she really should not have survived. It’s especially not fair considering the billions of others who died along the way in the destruction of humanity by aliens that you really don’t even get, you know?

The aliens are quite a source of mystery in this series. You never really are told outright what they want and then when you start figuring it out you find out that that wasn’t actually the truth to begin with and it just starts getting kind of confusing. It is quite surprising though that this whole series follows a group of literal children through the end of the world and at least some of them come out on the other side. Those are some tough kids.

Next on the list is finishing “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir” and “Furiously Happy” by Jenny Lawson (I’m pretty much in the middle of both of them at the same time), and then I’ll start on “Buffering” by Hannah Hart.

I have plenty of other books on my to-read list, but I’m also having this big problem where instead of reading books that I want to read and have never read before, I keep starting books that I want to read and have read approximately 17 times before. But we will make it through eventually. Probably not, but positive thoughts.

Later,
Maegan

“The Infinite Sea” by Rick Yancey

16131484This sequel definitely wasn’t as good as “The 5th Wave,” but it was still decent. I think it was more about building the characters up and explaining the in-between with some extra action thrown in there compared to the first book.

Rick Yancey definitely overdid the whole “the infinite sea” thing. It was probably mentioned seven times in the book and something like that where it’s a weird phrase that people don’t use AND it’s the name of the book sticks in your mind.

One thing that really bothers me in this book. There’s no holding back when it comes to killing people off, but this one character has stared death in the face like three times and he/she is still not dead. I can understand why he/she is not dead because he/she is integral in the big thing that’s happening in the book, but really? If he/she is going to survive death, just do it once and be done with it.

I’ve already started the final book in the trilogy, “The Last Star,” and it’s good so far but not as exciting as I had hoped. But more on that later.

I’m also still reading “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir” and “Furiously Happy,” both by Jenny Lawson, but one of my co-workers just gave me the book “Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded” by Hannah Hart and I have a feeling that I will start it before these others are done. Maybe I can resist, but no promises.

For now,
Maegan

“The 5th Wave” by Rick Yancey

512And8xM0LThis book is pretty decent as far as young adult dystopian novels go. I first read it a couple years ago before the movie version was released and I remember being in shock and awe over all the twists and turns in the plot. It definitely keeps you guessing right up until the end. Then it leaves you hanging. So clearly I have already started reading the second novel in the series, “The Infinite Sea,” which I have also read before. I’m really excited about getting to the third book, “The Last Star,” because that one had not been released when I was reading this series the first time, so it’s all new territory.

I actually think I did a library foul because I borrowed all three books at once in e-book and audiobook format. But you can’t blame me too much because I’m getting through them pretty quickly. Plus I couldn’t chance it if someone checked out the next book after the one I was currently reading, because then I would just have to sit and wait until they were done and that is no bueno.

I like the writing in this book a lot because it is in human speak and the dialogue actually sounds like kids speaking, instead of what some adult thinks kids would sound like if they had gone to a secret etiquette-based boarding school in their formative years. And there’s just enough annoying teen drama to make it realistic but not so much that you sigh and consider chucking the book out your bedroom window.

So basically the plot is this: Everything is fine and dandy in Ohio/the world until *dun dun duhhh* the Arrival. The Mothership shows up in the sky and then the “Others” start making insanely terribly things happen to eradicate all human life. These things come in waves, i.e. “The 5th Wave” is eminent at the start of this book. Not surprisingly at all, a bunch of teenagers/kids figure out what is going on and try to handle that mess. But of course, the book ends pretty much immediately after some big action so you really don’t have much information about the impact of their actions.

One thing that gets me in this book: There’s this analogy that keeps popping up about humans being the cockroaches of the world compared to the Others, which is fine. Cockroaches are gross, but still. But there’s this other analogy that keeps coming up where the main character is referred to as a mayfly by her male companion. Like ew. If you’re trying to be sweet or romantic, how about a butterfly or something less ew? Really, you’re comparing this girl to a gross bug that hovers around water or something. Way to get some brownie points. But for some reason that is completely mysterious to me, this chick completely digs it and is all about being referred to as a gross bug. Her prerogative, I guess.

Anywho, now I’m on to “The Infinite Sea” while also simultaneously reading Jenny Lawson’s first two books, “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir” and “Furiously Happy.”

Just call me a book reading fiend,
Maegan

“See Me” by Nicholas Sparks

201608-See-Me-TR-680x1020Let me preface this by saying that I’ve read virtually every book that this man has written. Every now and then, I like to read a good romance, and sometimes there’s even some suspense thrown in.

This book. It started out interesting, but by the end, I was gritting my teeth just to get through it.

Yes, there’s a love interest story line, but there’s no drama to it really. It’s a super typically timeline, with meet, meet again, meet a third time unintentionally, dating, etc. I think the author tried to spice things up by giving the main character a past, but it doesn’t do much for anything.

Fast forward to a big surprise, someone in the book is a criminal. There is so much potential for this plot. Instead, you just get stuck in a runaround where you’re not actually sure who the bad guy is. First it’s A, then it’s definitely A, then it’s B, but no because it’s definitely A, then it’s A and B, then it’s A again, then it’s A and C, but a very predictable C.

I don’t know, something about it just started bothering me. Like the story was trying so hard to be interesting that it just started being annoying.

In addition, the dialogue in this book is so formal. It’s unnatural, and off-putting, honestly. If you’re going to write a book in which your characters talk to each other, they should speak as they actually would in real life. Don’t try to fancy it up because it just makes them seem stiff and like you can’t relate to them.

Anyway, those are my thoughts. Started out all right, but by the end I wanted to throw this book across the room. Probably won’t stop me from still reading Nicholas Sparks’s other new book, “Two by Two.” Don’t even really know what that one’s about but I’ll probably still read it.

I’m also still reading “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir” by Jenny Lawson (have made literally zero progress since my last post), and I just started the audiobook of “The Cuckoo’s Calling” by Robert Galbraith, aka J.K. Rowling, because she/he is the queen of books.

Until next time,
Maegan

“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” by J.K. Rowling

dh-us-jacket-artI wrapped this book up a few days ago and have been meaning to post about it. It took a little shy of two years, but I reread the series! It definitely sped up near the end when I started utilizing my access to audiobooks though. Plus there was a pretty sizeable gap near “Prisoner of Azkaban” where I just didn’t touch these books.

I forgot how in this book most of the action happens in the second half. Then again, it’s more than 750 pages, so half the book is like a regular book elsewhere. But when I was reading I kept thinking of all the things that I knew were going to happen but hadn’t happened yet and it made me realize, this book is LONG.

Just so you know, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” is not a good airplane read. I tried it and my hands started aching from trying to hold it up. So stick to your paperbacks and make sure they’re less than 750+ pages.

As always, I’m amazed at J.K. Rowling and her ability to create this world and all the things and people in it. It just comes off as effortless. I’ve ready way too many books where the author tries to force characters into relationships or gives them dialogue that just seems super forced and rushed for where that character is in the story. There’s none of that here. This book could be a biography for the way it flows and the depth of character it brings. I just love Harry Potter and I just love J.K. Rowling.

Side note. I went on a cruise to the Bahamas a couple weeks ago and I very nearly won Harry Potter trivia. I got 19/20 questions correct and had to go head-to-head against four other Harry Potter nerds. Unfortunately I was bested because someone else was able to answer what James Potter’s wand was made of, but it was truly a highlight of the trip.

Anyway, I just started “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir)” by Jenny Lawson. I got this book for Christmas and I have been looking forward to reading it. I’m only about three chapters in, but it is hilarious. I am excited about this book.

I also started the audiobook of “A Dog’s Purpose: A Novel for Humans” by W. Bruce Cameron because I saw the movie and it was adorable, but I just don’t know if I can get into this book. I’m on chapter three or four and it just feels like it’s dragging. Maybe it’s the person reading the audiobook, or maybe it’s the book. Either way, I’m just not sure I’ll make it through this book. Even though I want to because the dog in the movie was beautiful and I want to keep him forever.

Until next time,
Maegan