“The Future of Us” by Jay Asher and Carolyn Mackler

10959277This book. It came back into my mind after re-reading and watching “Thirteen Reasons Why” because of Jay Asher. I read it several years ago and I remembered the plot but not much of the specifics.

But now I definitely know my tastes are changing because the main teenage girl in this book was ANNOYING. She didn’t care about how her actions affected anyone else and she was just so petty and selfish.

And I did not like the ending. Josh deserves better than everything he got in this book.

Basically, the premise of this book is that it’s the 90s and people just got into having personal computers and accessing the internet. Emma’s dad buys her a guilt computer because he lives in Florida now with his new wife and baby, then Emma’s friend Josh who she rejected 6 months ago brings her an AOL CD-ROM. They log on then bam! Facebook exists! Somehow these kids understand how it works and they are not at all confused by the name “Facebook.”

So they find their profiles, but it’s the profiles of their future selves 15 years down the road. Somehow they are only mildly freaked out about this. I don’t understand.

Anyway, Emma is not happy with the way her life turns out, so she keeps trying to change the future. Maybe it’s because Emma is a selfish teenager who can’t stop whining about her life and being rude to all the people who care about her. A couple times she succeeds, but whatevs. But there’s all this chatter about how the things you do now are creating time ripples that affect the future, even if you don’t even know what decisions you’re actually making right now.

Children. You should probably just focus on the present because none of your degrees and your good jobs are going to happen if you don’t finish your education first. Chillax.

So in conclusion, in the past I was all over this book but now all I can think is, “Wow, was I this obnoxious as a teenager too?” Sure hope not but we were probably all obnoxious then.

Now I have to go figure out my next read,
Maegan

“Thirteen Reasons Why” by Jay Asher

63be691d88d7134ce67fa02b36e9ac35Or is it “Th1rteen R3asons Why”?

Obviously I only read this book because I watched the Netflix series. But in my defense, I have read it before when I was in high school. I remembered the concept when I watched the show, which I was enraptured by, but I didn’t remember all the details. I think it’s for the best that I didn’t reread this book right before I watched the show or else I would have just been noticing all the differences because that’s how I live my life.

I know there’s a lot of talk going on right now about this story and I can see both sides of it. My thinking is that it’s awful what Hannah went through, but at the same time, she’s bringing down all of these other people that she knows, too. Is it necessary? I’m sure they hurt enough and already felt guilty before this box of tapes arrived on their front step.

I think it’s an interesting story, and I remember being fascinated with it when I read it years ago because suicide is like a taboo subject that people just don’t talk or write about. Even so, I don’t think this book was as good as I remembered, and the characters really just aren’t likeable. Even Clay, who is perceived as this total nice guy loses a little for how hung up on Hannah he was, because she didn’t seem that approachable to me at all.

Anyway, next on the list is “The Silkworm” by Robert Galbraith because J.K. Rowling.

See ya,
Maegan

“The Cuckoo’s Calling” by Robert Galbraith

51m4P63APoL._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_I have been wanting to read this one for a while and I’m glad I finally did. Obviously I was only interested because Robert Galbraith is just the pen name for J.K. Rowling and I love me some J.K. Rowling books, but this book definitely stands on its own. It doesn’t seem even remotely possible that the genius who created the Harry Potter world and the genius who created this murder mystery could be the same person. I mean, they’re both fantastic, but they are quite different.

“The Cuckoo’s Calling” is definitely British. I probably didn’t understand a quarter of the terms used because they were so British. Some of them I guessed at, honestly. It was almost like parts of the book were written in another language, even though it was still in English. I think it’s interesting how the Harry Potter series is considered a children’s series, but J.K. Rowling’s idea of a child’s level is closer to an adult level from the standard of anyone else.

Anywho, my favorite thing about this book is that the title is based off of one detail that probably only took up about 3 inches of space in the entire novel. It’s fascinating to me. I also noticed that nearly every one of these characters smoke and they all curse like a sailor. Except Robin. Probably why she’s my favorite character.

The whole premise of this book is that a famous model dies after falling from her balcony. Her brother hires the main character, Cormoran Strike, a private investigator, to find out whether she was murdered or not. So the whole time, you know someone did something bad. And the whole time, you’re trying to figure out who and why but the pieces don’t come together until the very end. At the reveal my only thoughts were “OMG NO WAY” because it was kinda a surprise, but the surprise was more in the details that have been there the whole time but you just didn’t notice because you’re not Robert Galbraith/J.K. Rowling.

I definitely want to read the rest of the series. And see the BBC show, because that’s going to be a thing too.

Next up, though, is “Thirteen Reasons Why” by Jay Asher. It’s a short one, so hopefully I will get through it quick. Then I need to finish the other books I’ve been neglecting and start chipping away at my “To Read” list.

Wish me luck,
Maegan