“I’ll Give You the Sun” by Jandy Nelson

16109340I’ve been wanting to read this book for a while and I finally got around to it.

The way it’s written is such that the chapters alternate from the points of view of a pair of twins, Noah and Jude. But the interesting thing is that the chapters told from Noah’s perspective are when the twins are 13 or 14 years old, and Jude’s chapters are when they’re 16.

I expected this to just be another feel good YA novel, but it was so much more than that. There were so many things that happened in these characters’ lives that you just kept twisting and turning through the story and near the end I didn’t want to put it down. It’s like everyone is connected, but you don’t know how until right up at the end. Several chapters seemed like they were going to give you something to grasp and then right at the end it ended and left you hanging.

One of the best parts of the book was the writing and the personification. These twins think in amazing, imaginative ways where colors come to life and trees come crashing down and people blast off into the sky. It’s almost breathtaking, the way these two teenage minds are explained. It made me feel like I was missing out because there is clearly so much in the world that I am not experiencing.

Some of the chapters were long, but it fits in with what needs to be told at each part of the story. Overall, this book was great and it makes me want to add Jandy Nelson’s other book, “The Sky is Everwhere” to my to-be-read list. Next up is finishing “The Martian” by Andy Weir, “Scrappy Little Nobody” by Anna Kendrick, and “Buffering” by Hannah Hart (I know, I know, still working on it, don’t judge).

Until next time,
Maegan

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“A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Wide Window” by Lemony Snicket

The_Wide_WindowI’ve finished another. Progress.

This is the third installment of “A Series of Unfortunate Events,” which detail the lives of poor Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire, who lost their parents and their massive house and all their belongings in a fire.

At this point, they’ve already been forced into Count Olaf’s house, then Uncle Monty, and now Aunt Josephine. Funny thing about Aunt Josephine: She lives in a house that is basically hanging out from a cliff over the top of a lake, but she’s terrified of everything, included, but not limited to, stoves, telephones, doorknobs, and welcome mats. Aunt Josephine means well but she is really not a very good guardian for the three orphans. And she is super annoyingly into grammar. I mean, I appreciate the nuances of the English language, but she corrects every grammar mistake made in her presence, to an unreasonable degree.

Of course, Count Olaf shows up, no one believes the orphans, Count Olaf is evil, and the Baudelaires are still miserable. At this point, they don’t have any more relatives to go to, so who knows what will happen to them next. Well I know because I’ve read the series before and watched the first season of the Netflix series. Nevertheless, more despair to come.

I’ll probably wait to start the fourth book, “The Miserable Mill,” until I’ve finished a book or two because I’m literally reading three other books right now too, which is pretty bad of me. But there’s just so much I want to experience that I can’t help myself. Fingers crossed that I can wrap up “I’ll Give You the Sun” by Jandy Nelson before it’s due back at the library.

I love libraries,
Maegan

“A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Reptile Room” by Lemony Snicket

The_Reptile_Room_USA.pngI finished this book a couple days ago (while I was enjoying the pool at my apartment complex). It’s a short book, so it’s one of those that you could probably finish in one sitting if you had a couple hours to spare.

In this second installation of the Baudelaires’ tale, the three orphans have convinced everyone that Count Olaf is insane and they have now been passed on to their Uncle Monty, whom they have never met before. His name is actually Dr. Montgomery Montgomery (no lie) but “Dr. Monty” just flows so much better.

You know from the beginning that something is going to happen because the author actually writes that this story will not have a happy ending and *character* will face *certain demise.* It’s actually pretty dark for a children’s series.

But anyway, Count Olaf is still evil and Mr. Poe (the banker who manages the children’s fortune) is still oblivious so more crazy antics that the Baudelaire orphans have to put up with.

I haven’t started reading the third book yet, “The Wide Window,” but I am reading “I’ll Give You the Sun” by Jandy Nelson. Plus I’m still working on “Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded” by Hannah Hart. They’re both really good books so far, I just haven’t made time to sit down and read them like I should.

To be honest, my to-be-read list keeps growing and growing and I feel like I’m barely making a dent. It’s a struggle. But I will conquer.

Later,
Maegan