“The Martian” by Andy Weir

18007564I’ve wanted to read this book ever since I saw the movie based off it a couple years ago. And now that I’ve read the book I want to watch the movie again. But from what I remember from the movie, it was pretty spot-on with the book.

The premise is that astronaut Mark Watney has just been stranded on Mars after his mission was aborted, he was injured, and his crew mates all thought he was dead. He is a much stronger man than most for being able to live on Mars alone for this long. He ends up being there about a year and a half, which is ridiculous when you think about it.

Anyway, shenanigans ensue because obviously it’s Mars. There’s always some problem that needs fixing or some impending doom that Mark has no idea he’s about to walk right into, but NASA can’t tell him because there are no functioning communications systems.

The book is told primarily from Mark’s point of view in the form of mission logs. Once it gets a little more into the plot, that alternates with the higher-ups at NASA and occasionally Mark’s original crew.

There’s a ton of science going on in this book, which I am super not into (science, that is), but things were explained relatively well. There were still a few parts where my eyes started glazing over while reading about chemical reactions and the like, but I made it through. It seems like there’s a lot more that goes into space missions than any of us non-space people would know. It was just a very interesting take and a different type of book than I usually choose. But I am glad that I read it.

That’s all for now,
Maegan

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“Scrappy Little Nobody” by Anna Kendrick

518K3i-ncIL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_I’ve had this book on my wish list for a couple months now and it was available so I decided to just go for it.

I’ve recently gotten into memoirs and I really like the Pitch Perfect series and Into the Woods so why not read Anna Kendrick’s? I’ve read her Twitter feed, so I knew what to expect and it’s refreshing that she just seemed so real in this book. She wasn’t trying to make people like her and she just said what she thought.

Honestly, I was hoping to read what it’s like being an actor and what goes into filming a movie but she didn’t dwell on that, and instead focused on the experiences she’s had and a few key people she’s had them with. I did learn that filming movies takes crazy hours though and you will probably gain five pounds just because of the abundance of food all over.

Anyway, it was just a witty read (listen) and I enjoyed it pretty well. I’m still working on “The Martian” and “Buffering.” I haven’t even started on the next “Series of Unfortunate Events” book, but I will. In time.

Later, Gator,
Maegan

“I’ll Give You the Sun” by Jandy Nelson

16109340I’ve been wanting to read this book for a while and I finally got around to it.

The way it’s written is such that the chapters alternate from the points of view of a pair of twins, Noah and Jude. But the interesting thing is that the chapters told from Noah’s perspective are when the twins are 13 or 14 years old, and Jude’s chapters are when they’re 16.

I expected this to just be another feel good YA novel, but it was so much more than that. There were so many things that happened in these characters’ lives that you just kept twisting and turning through the story and near the end I didn’t want to put it down. It’s like everyone is connected, but you don’t know how until right up at the end. Several chapters seemed like they were going to give you something to grasp and then right at the end it ended and left you hanging.

One of the best parts of the book was the writing and the personification. These twins think in amazing, imaginative ways where colors come to life and trees come crashing down and people blast off into the sky. It’s almost breathtaking, the way these two teenage minds are explained. It made me feel like I was missing out because there is clearly so much in the world that I am not experiencing.

Some of the chapters were long, but it fits in with what needs to be told at each part of the story. Overall, this book was great and it makes me want to add Jandy Nelson’s other book, “The Sky is Everwhere” to my to-be-read list. Next up is finishing “The Martian” by Andy Weir, “Scrappy Little Nobody” by Anna Kendrick, and “Buffering” by Hannah Hart (I know, I know, still working on it, don’t judge).

Until next time,
Maegan