“I’ll Give You the Sun” by Jandy Nelson

16109340I’ve been wanting to read this book for a while and I finally got around to it.

The way it’s written is such that the chapters alternate from the points of view of a pair of twins, Noah and Jude. But the interesting thing is that the chapters told from Noah’s perspective are when the twins are 13 or 14 years old, and Jude’s chapters are when they’re 16.

I expected this to just be another feel good YA novel, but it was so much more than that. There were so many things that happened in these characters’ lives that you just kept twisting and turning through the story and near the end I didn’t want to put it down. It’s like everyone is connected, but you don’t know how until right up at the end. Several chapters seemed like they were going to give you something to grasp and then right at the end it ended and left you hanging.

One of the best parts of the book was the writing and the personification. These twins think in amazing, imaginative ways where colors come to life and trees come crashing down and people blast off into the sky. It’s almost breathtaking, the way these two teenage minds are explained. It made me feel like I was missing out because there is clearly so much in the world that I am not experiencing.

Some of the chapters were long, but it fits in with what needs to be told at each part of the story. Overall, this book was great and it makes me want to add Jandy Nelson’s other book, “The Sky is Everwhere” to my to-be-read list. Next up is finishing “The Martian” by Andy Weir, “Scrappy Little Nobody” by Anna Kendrick, and “Buffering” by Hannah Hart (I know, I know, still working on it, don’t judge).

Until next time,
Maegan

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“Room” by Emma Donoghue

7937843This book is amazing. I remember reading it years ago right after it was published, not knowing what it was about or that it was such a new release. I was actually in high school at the time and I remember that I’ve never really forgotten any part of the plot because of the intensity of the situation and just how interesting the book is.

“Room” is told from the perspective of Jack, a five-year-old boy who’s only ever known the inside of a soundproof 11×11 garden shed, thanks to “Old Nick.” Jack refers to everything by its name, which is why he and his ma live in Room, use Toilet, play on Rug, etc. Jack’s mother is never named, but he just calls her Ma. Through his interactions with her, you come to realize that a lot of bad stuff has happened to Ma, but she’s doing a dang good job of raising him anyway.

I love the fact that this book was written from Jack’s point of view because it’s just such a different thought stream that you usually don’t get to see. The boy doesn’t really think in coherent sentences, but it’s clear that he knows a lot for someone who had never been outside or met another person before.

Obviously Ma does a lot to keep Jack safe and healthy, and because of that the two have an extraordinary bond. Mostly because they’ve been alone for five years, just the two of them. And because they’ve been in Room so long, Jack has in some ways become attached to the room itself. He doesn’t understand that it’s not normal, and he doesn’t really understand what happened to his ma and why they’re in Room to begin with.

This book is just different from most of the books I’ve read before. It could be a true story, based on the plot, and it was just such an interesting choice using Jack as the narrator. I’m sure that I will eventually read this one for a third time.

Here’s to finishing books three days in a row,
Maegan

“A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Wide Window” by Lemony Snicket

The_Wide_WindowI’ve finished another. Progress.

This is the third installment of “A Series of Unfortunate Events,” which detail the lives of poor Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire, who lost their parents and their massive house and all their belongings in a fire.

At this point, they’ve already been forced into Count Olaf’s house, then Uncle Monty, and now Aunt Josephine. Funny thing about Aunt Josephine: She lives in a house that is basically hanging out from a cliff over the top of a lake, but she’s terrified of everything, included, but not limited to, stoves, telephones, doorknobs, and welcome mats. Aunt Josephine means well but she is really not a very good guardian for the three orphans. And she is super annoyingly into grammar. I mean, I appreciate the nuances of the English language, but she corrects every grammar mistake made in her presence, to an unreasonable degree.

Of course, Count Olaf shows up, no one believes the orphans, Count Olaf is evil, and the Baudelaires are still miserable. At this point, they don’t have any more relatives to go to, so who knows what will happen to them next. Well I know because I’ve read the series before and watched the first season of the Netflix series. Nevertheless, more despair to come.

I’ll probably wait to start the fourth book, “The Miserable Mill,” until I’ve finished a book or two because I’m literally reading three other books right now too, which is pretty bad of me. But there’s just so much I want to experience that I can’t help myself. Fingers crossed that I can wrap up “I’ll Give You the Sun” by Jandy Nelson before it’s due back at the library.

I love libraries,
Maegan

“Murder on the Orient Express” by Agatha Christie

51drUi8B0HL._SY346_Honestly, I’ve kind of overwhelmed myself with reading lately. There are so many books that I want to read that I get overly excited and just start reading them all at once. So while reading this book I was also partway through four other books. More on those to come. I’m trying to chill a little until I finish a few but you know I probably won’t.

Anyway, I started reading this book because I saw the trailer for the new movie based on the book that’s coming out and I thought, “OMG, that looks so good, I must read it right now.”

I’ve never actually read an Agatha Christie book before, even though she is the best-selling author of all time, and I was already starting the book before I realized that “Murder on the Orient Express” is actually part of a series and is several books in from the beginning of said series. Nevertheless, I persisted, and I really don’t feel as though I missed anything by skipping all the other books.

The main character is detective Hercule Poirot. In this story, he just so happens to board a train that he is not meant to be on. At some point during travel, a passenger is stabbed twelve times, but luckily Poirot is there to solve the case.

I understand that this book was written in the early 1930s, but these interrogation methods would not fly during a real investigation. The detective would basically feed the suspects what he wanted to hear. For example, instead of asking, “What were your actions from 10:00 p.m. until midnight?” he would say, “You left the dining car and returned to your compartment at 9:37 p.m.?” Like, dude. Way to give them an out.

There was just something about this detective that I did not like. He came off as pretentious and a little egotistical because he knew how to solve the murder, but he wouldn’t explain how he came to his conclusions. And once he did solve the case, he spent several pages monologue-ing about his theories, seemingly just to prove how awesome he is.

Even after the case was solved, the director of the train (the same man who assumed that the Italian did it, just because he was Italian) pretty much just said, “Ok, this is what we’ll tell police.” I mean, are the police not going to do their own investigation? I feel like they could probably figure the thing out faster than Hercule Poirot. But maybe that’s not how they did things in 1934.

So now that I’ve finished, I would like to see the movie when it comes out because it looks very interesting and has a mighty fine cast.

I would also like to finish these other books I’m in the midst of, so I’ll do that first.

Until next time,
Maegan

“A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Reptile Room” by Lemony Snicket

The_Reptile_Room_USA.pngI finished this book a couple days ago (while I was enjoying the pool at my apartment complex). It’s a short book, so it’s one of those that you could probably finish in one sitting if you had a couple hours to spare.

In this second installation of the Baudelaires’ tale, the three orphans have convinced everyone that Count Olaf is insane and they have now been passed on to their Uncle Monty, whom they have never met before. His name is actually Dr. Montgomery Montgomery (no lie) but “Dr. Monty” just flows so much better.

You know from the beginning that something is going to happen because the author actually writes that this story will not have a happy ending and *character* will face *certain demise.* It’s actually pretty dark for a children’s series.

But anyway, Count Olaf is still evil and Mr. Poe (the banker who manages the children’s fortune) is still oblivious so more crazy antics that the Baudelaire orphans have to put up with.

I haven’t started reading the third book yet, “The Wide Window,” but I am reading “I’ll Give You the Sun” by Jandy Nelson. Plus I’m still working on “Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded” by Hannah Hart. They’re both really good books so far, I just haven’t made time to sit down and read them like I should.

To be honest, my to-be-read list keeps growing and growing and I feel like I’m barely making a dent. It’s a struggle. But I will conquer.

Later,
Maegan